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Stress Eating Got You Down Here’s How To Break The Habit

Tag: food

Stress Eating Got You Down Here’s How To Break The Habit

Are you the type that craves a snack when you start to feel your stress levels rising? Don’t worry, you’re not alone—the term ‘comfort food’ is popular for a reason, and that’s because whenever we’re anxious or troubled, a lot of us have been hardwired to turn to food. The problem is, not everyone goes for green leafy vegetables or any other healthier food option when stressed out. Instead, we choose junk food and for understandable reasons: these unhealthy options actually help reduce cortisol, the stress hormone itself, in our bloodstream—making the cycle of stress eating a habit that seems almost impossible to break.

 

But that’s not entirely true! There are steps we can all take to curb stress eating not only to stop this habit but also to introduce healthier coping mechanisms during times of stress. In today’s list, we introduce 3 ways that can help minimize—and even stop—stress eating for good.

 

 

  1. Hide or replace all that junk.

Those overly sugary, empty-calorie snacks you like munching on whenever you’re frazzled? Put them away where you can’t see them, and make sure they’re conveniently out of reach! Out of sight, out of mind: you don’t need temptation lying around and making it more difficult for you to stop yourself from stress eating. And here’s something even better: replace your junk food stash with healthier, more nutritious options altogether.

 

  1. Eat right.

By right, we mean two things: choose the best types of food that will keep you full for longer, and have set meal times to make sure you don’t end up so hungry that you opt for something quick and unhealthy. We already know that a quick snack, no matter how good, won’t satisfy hunger—so why not choose something more filling instead? That and if you eat on time, then you’re less likely to go looking for something to snack on even when you’re stressed.

 

  1. Manage stress.

Sometimes, it’s all about facing the problem head-on: what’s stressing you out? By figuring out your triggers, you can start looking at ways on how to manage stress. There are more effective ways to de-stress than just eating, and it’s just a matter of finding one that works for you. If you’re not sure how to proceed, here’s a list of stress management strategies to give you a headstart.

 

 

While it’s great if you could stop stress eating altogether and for good, don’t be so hard on yourself—breaking the habit can be a slow and gradual process. The most important thing is to make progress: start with the little things, like staying away from junk food, and then tackle the bigger, more complicated issues like pinpointing what’s causing you so much stress. Before you know it, you’re going for healthier options and managing stress like a pro. Good luck, and keep going. You can do it!

 

4 Immunity Boosting Habits To Help You Stay Healthy

Most of us probably know at least one person who rarely gets sick. You’ll hear them feeling under the weather once in a while, but overall, they’re as healthy as a horse. What sets them apart from us mere mortals? Two words: immune system. But hey—good thing there are easy steps we can take to give our own immunity a boost. And while there are a ton of ways to do that, we’ve narrowed today’s list down to four basic things that will give you the best headstart there is!

 

 

1.Get enough quality sleep.

According to studies, sleep and immunity are correlated and affect one another—consistent and quality sleep can help strengthen the immune system by allowing effective and balanced function. In short, proper sleep provides the immune system with the support it needs so that it can do its job: defending the body from infection and disease.

 

  1. Exercise!

Did you know that chronic inflammation can affect the immune system by slowing it down? Thankfully, regular exercise reduces inflammation, according to a study, which can ultimately help the immune system function better. Exercise is also linked to the following: a reduction in stress hormones (with chronic stress having a significant effect on immunity by manifesting as an illness), and stronger antibodies that aid in fighting off infection.

 

  1. Eat right.

According to Harvard, there are no specific foods that can “prepare the body for microbial attacks and excess inflammation”,—but certain ‘dietary patterns’ may better prepare the body’s immune response to illnesses. And because our immune system relies on different micronutrients to function properly, it’s important to eat healthy and nutritious meals based on our individual needs. Some examples of nutrients that were found to be critical for both the growth and function of immune cells include the following: vitamin C, vitamin D, zinc, selenium, iron, and protein.

 

  1. Minimize stress.

The stress hormone, called corticosteroid, can lower the number of lymphocytes in our body—that is, one of the main types of immune cells that help protect us from illnesses. This can make our immune system less effective, reducing our ability to fight off antigens and making us more prone to infections. Therefore, it’s important to find ways to manage stress. It can be through meditation, deep breathing, exercise (yes! Exercise again), and even counselling if it’s needed.

 

 

It’s worth noting that having a strong immune system can’t be achieved overnight. It’s all about dedication and consistency and a willingness to make the lifestyle change needed to become a better, healthier you. You can start slowly, taking small steps as you go, but the important thing here is to begin. Get into these good habits now and experience less instances of sickness for yourself!

 

Can Healthy Eating Make You Smarter? Here’s What We Know

For the longest time, parents were perfectly happy feeding their kids a whole bowl of sugar-coated cereal soaked in 100% milk with a side of artificially-flavoured orange juice every morning before school. They likewise survived until lunchtime on little else than a mug of coffee and two slices of avocado toast or two sunny-side-up eggs.

The goal wasn’t necessarily mental stimulation or clarity so much as it was “make it ‘til you can get a proper meal in.” A crying shame, to be sure, but very, very few can actually whip up a hearty, filling breakfast that nourishes both the brain and the body when pressed for time.

And besides; is such a thing possible?

 

Smarter Snacking

According to a study published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, a diet “high in fat, sugars, and processed foods in early childhood may result in lower IQ scores.”

That’s a yikes.

Meanwhile, scientists over at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, have learned that levels of lutein – a nutrient present in leafy greens (like spinach and kale) and eggs – may be linked to cognitive performance across our life span, particularly “in the grey matter of brain regions.” It’s basically like an anti-aging compound for the brain.

And speaking of eggs, did you know that they’re also packed with a memory-improving substance known as choline? Meanwhile, salmon and walnuts are over here brimming with essential fatty acids that improve brain function.

So what’s the verdict? Can food really make you smarter?

“Smarter” might be too generic a term. I’m not saying that eating nothing but salmon and eggs for the rest of your life is going to boost your IQ some ten, twenty points. But there is significant evidence that suggests doing so will improve your comprehension and memory capacity (both short-term and long-term retrieval).

Basically, there are some foods that could potentially improve all matters regarding grey matter, and their assertions are all scientifically backed. Here’s a quick list:

    1. Salmon – a great source of that delectable “good kind of fat,” omega-3 fatty acids. Recent research (published around 2017) suggests that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are crucial for improving cognitive functions.

 

    1. Eggs – a delicious-and-nutritious two-for-one, eggs contain high amounts of choline and lutein; two substances linked heavily to memory matters. Lutein helps slow down cognitive decline. Choline, on the other hand, is essential for brain and nervous system functions that include mood, muscle control, and – yep! – memory.

 

    1. Walnuts – touted as a “brain-booster” and “mood-stabilizer,” a decent amount of studies have linked walnuts with improved productivity and problem-solving capabilities. No surprise there, seeing as walnuts also contain high traces of good old omega-3.

 

    1. Spinach, Kale, and Other Leafy Greens – we mentioned spinach and kale in the context of lutein, but did you know that the iron in them can give you a shot of brain clarity?

      Iron is an essential mineral that the body uses to transport oxygen to all systems. If you’re low on oxygen-carrying red blood cells (which will happen if you’re low on iron), you could experience an intense brain fog linked with fatigue.

 

  1. Beets – and on the topic of bringing oxygen to the brain, beets contain specific dietary nitrates; special compounds that can be converted to nitric oxide. Our bodies use nitric oxide to relax our blood vessels and increase blood flow (specifically, oxygen-rich blood) to the brain.It may seem like a stretch, but a 2016 study showed that older adults – aged 60 and up – who drank beetroot juice for six weeks straight experienced significant brain benefits. What’s more, their brains took on similar appearances to those of adults younger than them.

The Verdict?

We are what we eat. If we choose to eat food that could, potentially, improve our grey matter and cognitive functions, who’s going to be upset? Popping a handful of walnuts every day or increasing your spinach intake may not give you tangible or immediate brain-boosting results, but it’s also not going to harm you in any way.

So cook up your salmon and serve it with a side of beets! Even if it doesn’t give you the photographic memory you were looking for, it’s still going to taste (and feel!) pretty darn good.

If you’d like to find out how Hearty Health can help keep you eat well and feel, or find out more about how you can get Hearty Health ready meals direct to you or at your facility, simply call 1300 728 764 or email hello@heartyhealth.com.au